Even seemingly minor crimes can lead to deportation

Even seemingly minor crimes can lead to deportation

On Behalf of | Jan 18, 2022 | Immigration

Many crimes can be grounds for the deportation of immigrants who live in the Charlotte area.

Certain convictions can even mean that a permanent resident will have her status revoked and will have to return to her home country.

It is also important to realize that it does not matter whether a person’s conviction is after a trial or because of a guilty plea. Signing a plea deal might reduce an immigrant’s other punishments, but it may not have a bearing on deportation.

For some offenses, it might some pretty obvious why deportation would be on the table. Not surprisingly, certain crimes related to national security, like spying, as well as major violent crimes and sex crimes can lead to deportation.

However, it may be surprising how easily a one-time mistake can also expose a person to the possibility of deportation.

For example, if a person gets convicted of trafficking any amount of an illegal drug, or even of just having the intent to distribute, he will face deportation.

Even a drug charge involving simple possession of a drug, with an exception for smaller amounts of marijuana, can be grounds for deportation. Thankfully, a single conviction for drugged or drunk driving usually will not have adverse immigration consequences.

Drug crimes aside, an immigrant in the North Carolina area may run into immigration trouble for any crime of domestic violence, theft-related crimes or for any offense related to the illegal possession or use of a firearm.

Fortunately, after many drug possession offenses and lower level convictions, an immigrant may have defenses to being deported.

An immigrant charged with a crime should be informed of the options

If a person faces a criminal charge in North Carolina and is not a United States citizen, she should make sure she understands all of the consequences of getting convicted.

Specifically, an immigrant  should make sure that a conviction will not lead to a surprise deportation case, especially if he has put down roots in the United States. He may need to mount a legal defense even to what might seem like a minor charge.